Civil Appeals

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n Attorney Focused on Civil Appeals in Washington and California. We help attorneys, clients, or individuals file civil appeals quickly and accurately, saving time and money.

Understanding Civil Appeals
Handling the appellate process is a demanding, complicated, and time-sensitive task. Appellate work requires some of the most sophisticated legal reasoning performed by an attorney. As an attorney with experience in both the trial courts and appeals courts, Mr. Parker is prepared to analyze your case, assemble the required “record on appeal,” file all briefs, and provide oral argument.

Corey Evan Parker offers representation on civil appeals to attorneys and clients in California and Washington. Mr. Parker will not hesitate to tell you if he advises against filing an appeal. Additionally, he can file petitions for writ of mandate to the court of appeals for interim orders that are not appealable. (It is also important to consider obtaining appellate advice before trial, in order to help preserve and identify appellate issues that may be overlooked or unassailable after final judgment.)

Our Process

1

Notice of Appeals

Once a judgment has been entered, and the decision to appeal has been made, we prepare the formal notice of appeal and ensure that all of the required fees are paid.

2

Record on Appeal

The court of appeals will ask the appellant to designate the paperwork that is necessary to support the legal arguments for the appeal. Failure to file this timely and accurately will cause delays or, worse, a dismissal. We take care that every document is filed on time and with all the necessary information.

3

Motions and Oral Arguments

If there are problems with the appeal or an oral argument needs to be presented, Mr. Parker can handle these items for you. Once the final decision is rendered by the court of appeal, we can assess whether there are any further remedies to pursue, such as reconsideration in the appeal court or petition for review to the supreme court.

California Civil Appeals

In California, you are able to file a Notice of Appeal when the judgment has been signed and deemed “Filed” by the superior court judge and court clerk.  This is the official entry of judgment.  (You can also file an appeal from certain interim orders that are deemed immediately appealable or a petition for writ of mandate from those orders that are not appealable.)

You have the following appeal deadlines in California courts:

Limited Civil Case (cases that involve $25,000 or less) you must appeal within:

  • 30 days after you receive a mailed notice that your judgment has been filed
  • 90 days after the formal entry of judgment
  • Unlimited Civil Cases (more than $25,000) you must appeal within:

  • 60 days after you receive a mailed notice that your judgment has been filed
  • 180 days after the formal entry of judgment
  • You cannot ask for more time to file an appeal; if your notice to appeal is not within deadline, it will be dismissed.

    Washington Civil Appeals

    The Washington Court of Appeals has three divisions: in Seattle (Division I), Tacoma (Division II), and Spokane (Division III). Similar to California courts, you are able to file an appeal in Washington after a case judgment has been officially entered by the court judge and county clerk. If you plan to appeal a case, the notice must be filed within 30 days of the entry of judgment.   

    You have the following appeal deadlines in Washington courts:

    Rule 5.2 of the Rules of Appellate Procedure governs the time allowed to file a notice of appeal...

    Generally a notice of appeal must be filed in the trial court within the longer of 30 days after the entry of the decision of the trial court that the party filing the notice wants reviewed or the time provided in section 5.2 (e). In some circumstances, the statute specifically governs the time period to file and in those circumstances, the notice of appeal must be filed within the statutory time period.

    Rule 5.2 (e) states that if a statute provides that a notice of appeal, a petition for extraordinary writ, or a notice for...

    discretionary review must be filed within a time period other than 30 days after entry of the decision to which the motion is directed, the number of days after the entry of the order deciding the motion established by the statute for initiating review. The motions to which this rule applies are a motion for arrest of judgment under CrR 7.4, a motion for new trial under CrR 7.5, a motion for judgment as a matter of law under CR 50(b), a motion to amend findings under CR 52(b), a motion for reconsideration or new trial under CR 59, and a motion for amendment of judgment under CR 59.

    Rule 5.2(d) states that if a statute provides that a... notice of appeal, a petition for extraordinary writ, or a notice for...

    discretionary review must be filed within a time period other than 30 days after entry of the decision, the notice required by these rules must be filed within the time period established by the statute.

    Hiring an Attorney Focused on Appeals

    Appeals are time sensitive, complicated, and take a significant amount of legal research, time, and money. A mistake in procedure or failing to meet the proper deadlines will very likely lead to the dismissal of your appeal. Contact the Law Office of Corey Evan Parker to work with an attorney focused on appeals serving Washington and California. Mr. Parker takes into account your version of the events and will diligently review the transcript of the proceeding to determine what issues will provide the best chance of a favorable outcome from the higher courts.

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